Reply To: Working for out of state company.

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Companies have different hometime policies. I know a little about Prime because I almost went to work for a trucking company that pulls Prime loads. With them, you are required to stay out weeks. For each week you are out you earn about 1 day off/home. A couple of weeks before you want to go home/time off you put in a request, tell them where you need to go, and they will try to make that happen. You usually leave the trailer with a customer or a company yard and need to find an approved parking spot for the tractor. DO NOT ASSUME YOU CAN PARK TRUCK AT YOUR HOME until you have FACTS to confirm it. Neighborhoods, Home Owners Associations, cities may make it impossible. In those cases you have to find something like a tow-truck yard, RV or self-storage facility and pay them (out of your pocket) for each day you use them.

For the big national companies your time off doesn’t have to be taken at the address on your job application. The company I thoroughly investigated simply waited for you to tell them which zip code you expected to take time off. If you had no home or no strong interest in a particular spot you could designate various other spots for time off. You could designate Las Vegas, then Amarillo, then Asheville, or any other spot they travel through.

If you are working for a company that says “off on weekends” you need to pick a company with a terminal near your home town otherwise you are making it unlikely you will be “off on weekends.” While companies try to get you home, if their freight is going near where you live you are likely to get home. If you live on the far edge of their service area you are not getting home as easily. The words of a recruiter do not change how a trucking company operates.

If you want results like RVT you have to research,, understand, and work like RVT. Throwing the dice and taking a risk will not produce the same results. I strongly suggest you not make a decision until you can talk to a current working driver at any company your are considering. Which means more what a TV ads says about some car or what your neighbor who drives that car says about his experience the last few months?